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Filtered results for: "Accessibility"

​The Global Move to WCAG 2.0 and The Case for Conformance

Accessibility for people with disabilities is more important now than ever before. The last decade has shown how information technology (particularly the Internet) opens up new worlds for an ever-increasing number of people with disabilities. At the same time, Web accessibility standards have also evolved to keep pace. This white paper explains the global trend to adopt the Web Accessibility Content Guidelines (WCAG 2.0) – the most important and influential Web accessibility standard worldwide — and why it provides a better accessibility experience for users with disabilities.

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Four Steps to Readily Achievable Web Accessibility

In the absence of specific regulations for Web accessibility in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), businesses are left without legal guidance on how to make their complex websites accessible. Some advocate for full compliance with WCAG 2.0 in all content while others argue that nothing is required at all. This white paper discusses the risks to businesses that do not employ Web accessibility citing recent lawsuits, and suggests some best practices for readily achievable Web accessibility that any business can employ.

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Guidance at a Glance: Web Accessibility

Do you know what where to start or how to improve your Web accessibility? If you are not sure what to do, download our whitepaper to help you kick start or improve your existing Web accessibility program to meet compliance.

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The Changing Legal Landscape of Web Accessibility in Higher Education

Universities face liability if their Web content is inaccessible under Section 504 and other laws. This is further complicated by new laws and regulations that change some of these obligations, but also the standards for what constitutes “accessible” Web content. Colleges and universities also face the increasing chance of liability due to disability rights organizations filing more complaints and lawsuits based on these laws. The lawsuits filed are also extending liability beyond the Web to include other new technologies used in education. This white paper will provide guidance on the changing legal landscape of Web accessibility in higher education.

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